Nemtsov Readings

A state based on a rule of law. How is this idea seen by the public and how does it translate into real political actions

On February 27, 2018, the third anniversary of assassination of Boris Nemtsov, prominent Russian politician, social activist and true citizen, Sakharov centre in Moscow hosted a scientific conference on matters of building a state governed by the rule of law in Russia. Leading Russian legal experts, historians, sociologists, liberal politicians and social activists reviewed a number of key aspects related to the future of the rule of law in Russia. Lev Gudkov, doctor of philosophy and head of Levada centre looked into how the idea of a law-based state is interpreted by public opinion and translates into real politics

A state governed by the rule of law: is this mission totally impossible?

On February 27, 2018, the third anniversary of assassination of Boris Nemtsov, prominent Russian politician, social activist and true citizen, Sakharov centre in Moscow hosted a scientific conference on matters of building a state governed by the rule of law in Russia. Leading Russian legal experts, historians, sociologists, liberal politicians and social activists reviewed a number of key aspects related to the future of the rule of law in Russia

Liberalism and revival of religion and church

All post-Soviet countries, including Russia, undergo a religious revival, which is often accompanied by stronger conservatism. In this case it is important to define whether there are any liberal scenarios which imply interaction among individuals, society, church, and religion?

Authoritarian Russia and possible paths to a law-based and constitutional state

Every expert agrees with the statement of the fundamental fact: modern Russia that legally and politically defined itself after 1991 as a law-based and constitutional state is in practice neither of the two. The Constitution of 1993 declaring the rule of law and inviolability of the fundamental rights and freedoms of citizens does not work in practice

Mission is possible, but it will take a lot of hard work

Is the mission of building a law-based state in Russia possible? Still remaining in the same paradigm, I would like to cast a look at this problem at a slightly different angle. I am not as pessimistic as everyone else mostly because a lot has been accomplished in these 25 years given the gloomy USSR heritage. So we do have hope…